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The role of biofeedback in the rehabilitation of veno-occlusive erectile dysfunction

Abstract

Background

Pelviperineal muscles play a role in erection through the enhancement of blood flow to the penis. Hence, the reinforcement of the power of such muscles through noninvasive visual pressure biofeedback rehabilitation may be helpful in erectile function improvement.

Aim

The aim of this study was to assess the value of pelviperineal muscles’ visual pressure biofeedback rehabilitation in the treatment of organic veno-occlusive erectile dysfunction (ED).

Materials and methods

This study included 30 patients with veno-occlusive ED. Exclusion criteria were neurological, psychological, endocrinal, and arterial insufficiency ED. Also, patients with malignancies, chronic renal failure, liver cell failure, urological congenital abnormalities, pelvic surgery, pelvic radiation, or trauma and patients on medications known to cause ED were excluded. All patients performed visual pressure biofeedback strengthening of the pelviperineal muscles three times weekly for 3 months. In addition to clinical and laboratory evaluations, patients were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire, a neurophysiological examination, a pharmacopenile duplex ultrasound, and the anal hold pressure.

Results

According to the self-administered questionnaire, 16/30 patients (53.3%) showed either partial or complete improvement (11 and five patients, respectively). On comparing prerehabilitation and postrehabilitation results of the pharmacopenile duplex ultrasound, 18/30 patients (60%) showed either partial or complete improvement (13 and five patients, respectively). The anal hold pressure improved from 120.7 to 189.9 after biofeedback rehabilitation.

Conclusion

Pelviperineal muscles’ visual pressure biofeedback rehabilitation is effective, inexpensive, noninvasive, safe, and easily applicable in the treatment of venogenic ED and does not have as much side effects as medication.

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Correspondence to Mahmoud M. Fathalla MD.

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Al-Helow, M.R., Abdul-Hady, H., Fathalla, M.M. et al. The role of biofeedback in the rehabilitation of veno-occlusive erectile dysfunction. Egypt Rheumatol Rehabil 41, 179–186 (2014). https://doi.org/10.4103/1110-161X.147362

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Keywords

  • cavernosal artery diameter
  • end-diastolic velocity
  • erectile dysfunction
  • pharmacopenile duplex ultrasound
  • peak systolic velocity
  • visual pressure biofeedback